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The Authors’ Own Words: Co-prescription of naloxone as a Universal Precautions model for patients on chronic opioid therapy—Observational study

We ask authors to describe their impressions regarding the implications of their accepted work, how their findings will change practice, and what is noteworthy about the work.

Substance Abuse Vol. 37 , Iss. 4,2016

Since opioid overdose death is such a pressing public health issue, harm reduction innovations to prevent overdose death are critical to study. The ambulatory co-prescribing of naloxone is a universal precaution model for all patients prescribed chronic opioid therapy. This can be adapted universally for all patients treated with chronic opioid therapy in an ambulatory setting so that there is increased availability and utilization in the case of an opioid overdose.

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Our newly released issue is now online —> April-June 2017.
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The Authors’ Own Words: A qualitative analysis of family involvement in prescribed opioid medication monitoring among individuals who have experienced opioid overdoses

We ask authors to describe their impressions regarding the implications of their accepted work, how their findings will change practice, and what is noteworthy about the work.

Substance Abuse Vol. 37 , Iss. 1,2016

 

Family-initiated efforts to monitor or manage opioid medications were more common when misuse was known only to family members or when the patient was seen as particularly vulnerable, especially when elderly or suicidal. These efforts were met with varying levels of acceptance by patients and were often unknown by clinicians. Our findings suggest that efforts to foster collaborative treatment planning involving patients, families, and clinicians could help reduce the risk of opioid overdoses.

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Our newly released issue is now online —> April-June 2017.
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The Authors’ Own Words: The impact of sharing: The use of shared medical appointments to allow providers to increase treatment access for substance use and related disorders

We ask authors to describe their impressions regarding the implications of their accepted work, how their findings will change practice, and what is noteworthy about the work.

Substance Abuse Vol. 37 , Iss. 1,2016

Physicians represent the first line of treatment for these high risk individuals. Our aim was to showcase an already proven model of treatment in a new venue, utilizing the shared medical appointment for the management of opioid use and related disorders. This method not only demonstrates an effective and efficient way for providers to treat opioid use disorders, but also allows for more time to be spent with this high risk individual population.

The manuscript provides providers struggling with multitudes of individuals with opioid use and related disorders an opportunity to offer an effective care option.

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Our newly released issue is now online —> April-June 2017.
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The Authors’ Own Words: Management of opioid use disorders among veterans in subacute rehab: Use of an interdisciplinary task force to address an emerging concern

We ask authors to describe their impressions regarding the implications of their accepted work, how their findings will change practice, and what is noteworthy about the work.

Substance Abuse Vol. 37 , Iss. 1,2016

This paper serves as a useful example of the way one medical system has begun addressing the issue of managing opioid use disordered patients in a non-addictions setting. Caring for such patients can be especially stressful for medical professionals who are not trained in addictions. The coming together of many disciplines in the form of a task force highlights the fact that caring for the patients requires a multifaceted approach to improve patient safety and patient outcomes. Use of a task force also allowed for problems to be identified and solved quickly and efficiently.  Further, the use of this model really helped bring a distressed team together with a unified mission to tackle the prevalent and potentially deadly issue of caring for those with active opioid addictions in a general medical ward.

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Our newly released issue is now online —> April-June 2017.
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Call for Papers Deadline Extension

We received a great Intent to Submit response for our recent Call for Papers and are in the process of seeing some of the manuscripts entering our online system.

To honor vacation season, we’ve decided to lengthen the deadline to next Friday, August 21.

If you have a paper that aligns with our theme of Implementation and Quality Improvement: Applying and Advancing Best Practices in Opioid Use Disorder Treatment, please send an Intent to Submit email to substanceabuseeditor@gmail.com by Friday, August 21st with the intended title and a brief description  of the intended work.

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2018 Special Section Call for Papers – Intent to Submit Deadline Approaches

Our August 15th deadline for an Intent to Submit email is approaching for our 2018 Special Section. The topic is Implementation and Quality Improvement: Applying and Advancing Best Practices in Opioid Use Disorder Treatment. We’ve received a number of intent emails thus far and look forward to reviewing yours!

Topics of interest include:

  • Quality improvement in Opioid Overdose Education and Naloxone Distribution (OEND) programs, including linkage with OUD treatment
  • Innovations in clinical trial, epidemiology, health services, and translational addiction research
  • Implementation science research
  • Addiction program quality improvement
  • Addiction policy and education initiatives
  • Interdisciplinary research conducted by health professionals who are traditionally underrepresented in addiction research (e.g., pharmacists)

For full details, please view our Call for Papers:

thumbnail of Call for Papers PCSS-O 2017

 

As always, we welcome any questions – please email the Editor-in-Chief at substanceabuseeditor@gmail.com.

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The Authors’ Own Words: Medication Assisted Treatment for Substance Use Disorders within a National Community Health Center Research Network

We ask authors to describe their impressions regarding the implications of their accepted work, how their findings will change practice, and what is noteworthy about the work.

Medication-assisted treatment for substance use disorders within a national community health center research network
Substance Abuse Vol. 37 , Iss. 4,2016

Our manuscript details a descriptive research study about care for substance use disorders in non-specialty settings; we examine prevalence rates, patient characteristics, utilization of medication assisted treatments, and screening for safety net patients from a national network of community health centers. Findings from this study provide important information about the low rates of use of medication assisted treatments in primary care settings, and also provide insights into the characteristics and care for uninsured patients, a population often overlooked in most studies utilizing insurance claims data. The implications of these findings include a focused understanding of the treatment needs and future steps that need to be taken in order to adequately address substance use disorders in safety net populations.

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Our newly released issue is now online —> January-April 2017.
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The Authors’ Own Words: Vicarious trauma and vicarious posttraumatic growth among substance abuse treatment provider

We ask authors to describe their impressions regarding the implications of their accepted work, how their findings will change practice, and what is noteworthy about the work.

Vicarious trauma and vicarious posttraumatic growth among substance abuse treatment provider
Substance Abuse Vol. 37 , Iss. 4,2016

Many clients who are in treatment for substance abuse also have a history of trauma. Treatment providers acknowledge the role that trauma plays in substance abuse and many provide integrated treatment for trauma symptoms and substance abuse. Unfortunately, programmatic changes have proceeded faster than has our understanding of the impact of this work on substance abuse treatment providers. In particular, we know that working with clients who have experienced trauma can result in vicarious trauma and/or vicarious posttraumatic growth. This study examined factors associated with vicarious trauma and vicarious posttraumatic growth for counselors working with clients in substance abuse treatment. Counselors who were in recovery were more likely than other counselors to report a history of trauma; they also reported higher levels of vicarious trauma and vicarious posttraumatic growth. This study identified risk factors for counselors’ experiencing vicarious trauma and vicarious posttraumatic growth, and points to the importance of preparing counselors, both personally and professionally, for addressing trauma within substance abuse treatment programs.

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Our newly released issue is now online —> January-April 2017.
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The Authors’ Own Words: Intoxication and binge and high-intensity drinking among US young adults in their mid-20s

We ask authors to describe their impressions regarding the implications of their accepted work, how their findings will change practice, and what is noteworthy about the work.

Intoxication and binge and high-intensity drinking among US young adults in their mid-20s
Substance Abuse Vol. 37 , Iss. 4,2016

The likelihood of discussing alcohol use with a doctor or other health professional has been shown to decrease sharply after age 24, but empirical studies of high-risk alcohol use among this group have not been available to indicate if such decreased clinician communication overall is warranted. Our study, which estimated the prevalence of a range of alcohol use behaviors among US young adults aged 25/26, found that 39.9% of these young adults reported being intoxicated at least once in the past 30 days and 25.6% reported usually experiencing a sustained high of 3 or more hours when drinking alcohol. In the past two weeks, binge drinking (5+ drinks in a row) was reported by 36.3% of respondents, and 12.4% reported high-intensity drinking (10+ drinks in a row). These rates of age 25/26 alcohol use remained stable over the ten years of data examined, in contrast to significant declines over historical time in alcohol prevalence rates among these same individuals at age 18. Results suggest that high-risk alcohol use prevention approaches to reach young adults in their mid-twenties are needed, as are efforts to increase proactive screening to identify young adults participating in high-risk alcohol use.

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Our newly released issue is now online —> January-April 2017.
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Fruit and vegetable intake as a moderator of the association between depressive symptoms and cigarette smoking

We ask authors to describe their impressions regarding the implications of their accepted work, how their findings will change practice, and what is noteworthy about the work.

Fruit and vegetable intake as a moderator of the association between depressive symptoms and cigarette smoking
Substance Abuse Vol. 37 , Iss. 4,2016

Cigarette smoking prevalence persists as a major clinical and public health problem, especially among persons with a depression history. In this pre-clinical and observational cohort study, we found fruit and vegetable intake to moderate the association between depression and smoking. After controlling for demographic characteristics and general health behavior orientation, there was only an association between depressive symptoms and smoking among respondents with low to moderate levels of fruit and vegetable intake cross-sectionally. When tested longitudinally, persons with elevated depressive symptoms at baseline were only less likely to quit smoking four years later at low levels of FVI. However, there was no association between depressive symptoms and smoking at higher levels of fruit and vegetable intake. We also discuss potential mechanisms of action for our results such as monoamine-oxidase inhibition, a known factor associated with smoking, fruit and vegetable intake, and depression. Future clinical research could elucidate whether or not increased fruit and vegetable intake might serve as an adjunct to smoking cessation among persons with a depression history.

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Our newly released issue is now online —> October-December 2016.
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